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Cold

Superfiction
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Six years is a lot of time, and a lot can be done in more than half of a decade. For Scooter Ward and Cold, it’s been an odd six years. Here are the important points for Cold’s music career in the past six years. The band broke up. Scooter went into solo mode but with Idiot Pilot’s Michael Harris in tow with The Killer and the Star. Scooter formed Sonicstar records with the idea of releasing Killer and the Star music on that label. Cold reunited to start touring. The announcement was made that they were working on new music. The announcement was made that they were STILL working on new music. The band signed to Eleven Seven Music. And finally, “Superfiction” was released. So yeah, it’s been awhile for a Cold record, but Cold hasn’t been out of music news completely. Six years since their last release, and “Superfiction” is finally here and it’s great. The first thing you need to know about the new album is that it is fiction. Instead of writing songs about his pain and his life, Scooter has some fictional stuff that he’s writing and singing about here. That’s both good and bad. It’s a little off because of the connection that Scooter made with Cold fans on the previous albums isn’t renewed the way it was. But again, that goes back to six years being a lot of time and not only Scooter growing and changing, but his audience doing the same. Going with a fictional approach on this record wasn’t a bad move. That’s not to say these songs are great, because the melodies here are terrific. The lyrics might not be as intimate or introspective as they once were for Cold, but the music and the production on “Superfiction” is better than it’s ever been. It’s not atmospheric, it’s consistent. But all of these songs have big dramatic/swinging production that makes up for that lack of that personal Cold approach. That and the guitars on “Superfiction” are filtered and have effects to them in different ways than previous Cold albums. That takes away from a bit of monotony that “A Different Kind of Pain” struggled with. Cold doesn’t like to make the same album twice, and to this point they haven’t done that. That includes this new record, it’s not as personal but it sounds better than it ever has, and that has to count for something.






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